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State
Washington Regulations
Chapter 352-60 WAC Recreational vessel equipment and operation

Last Update: 3/10/98



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352-60-010
Purpose.
This chapter is promulgated in order to establish standards for boating safety equipment and related activities in recreational boating in accordance with RCW 43.51.400.

Application. These requirements apply to all recreational vessels used on waters of the state of Washington.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-010, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-010, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-020
Definitions.
When used in this chapter the following words and phrases shall have the meanings designated in this section unless a different meaning is expressly provided or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

"Carrying passengers for hire" means carrying passengers in a vessel on waters of the state for valuable consideration, whether given directly or indirectly or received by the owner, agent, operator, or other person having an interest in the vessel. This shall not include trips where expenses for food, transportation, or incidentals are shared by participants on an even basis. Anyone receiving compensation for skills or money for amortization of equipment and carrying passengers shall be considered to be carrying passengers for hire on waters of the state.

"Coastal waters" means those waters (i.e., bays, sounds, harbors, rivers, inlets, etc.) directly connected to the territorial seas of the state of Washington where any entrance exceeds two nautical miles between opposite shorelines to the first point where the largest distance between shorelines narrows to two miles, as shown on the current edition of the appropriate National Ocean Service chart used for navigation. Shorelines of islands or points of land present within a waterway are considered when determining the distance between opposite shorelines.

"International waters" means the high seas within the territorial limits of Washington state seaward of the demarcation lines dividing the high seas from the harbors, rivers, bays, sounds, and other inland waters, as established in Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 80, and are governed by the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972, (72 COLREGS), Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81-72, Appendix A.

"Inland waters" means the waters within the territorial limits of Washington state shoreward of the demarcation lines dividing the high seas from harbors, rivers, bays, sounds, and other inland waters, as established in Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 80, which are not governed by the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972, (72 COLREGS), Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81-72, Appendix A.

"Length" means a straight line measurement of the overall distance from the foremost point of a vessel to the aftermost part of a vessel, measured parallel to the centerline not including bow sprits, bumpkins, boomkins, rudders, outboard motor brackets, outdrive units, propellers, and similar fittings or attachments.

"Observer" means an individual riding in a vessel who is responsible for observing a water skier at all times.

"Operate" means to steer, direct, or otherwise have physical control of a vessel that is underway.

"Operator" means an individual who steers, directs, or otherwise has physical control of a vessel that is underway or exercises actual authority to control the person at the helm.

"Owner" means a person who has a lawful right to possession of a vessel by purchase, exchange, gift, lease, inheritance, or legal action whether or not the vessel is subject to a security interest.

"Person" means any individual, sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, nonprofit corporation or organization, limited liability company, firm, association, or other legal entity located within or outside this state.

"Personal flotation device" means a wearable Type I off-shore life jacket, Type II wearable near-shore buoyant vest, Type III wearable flotation aid, Type IV throwable ring buoy or buoyant cushion, or Type V special use device or hybrid inflatable device, that is approved by the United States Coast Guard Commandant under Chapter 46, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 160.

"PFD" means a personal flotation device.

"Power-driven vessel" means any vessel propelled by machinery.

"Sailing vessel" means any vessel under sail provided that propelling machinery, if fitted, is not being used.

"Racing shell, rowing scull, and racing kayak" means any manually propelled boat that is recognized by a national or international racing association for use in competitive racing, in which all occupants row, scull, or paddle, with the exception of a coxswain, if one is provided, and which is not designed to carry and does not carry any equipment not solely for competitive racing.

"Underway" means that a vessel is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.

"Use" means to operate, navigate, moor or employ.

"Vessel" means every description of watercraft used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on the water, other than a seaplane. However, it does not include inner tubes, air mattresses, and small rafts or flotation devices or toys customarily used by swimmers.

"Vessel engaged in fishing" means any vessel fishing with nets, lines, trawls or other fishing apparatus which restrict maneuverability, but does not include a vessel fishing with trolling lines or other fishing apparatus which do not restrict maneuverability.

"Vessel not under command" means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to maneuver as required by these requirements and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel.

"Vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver" means a vessel which from the nature of her work is restricted in her ability to maneuver as required by these requirements and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel. Vessels restricted in their ability to maneuver include, but are not limited to:

? A vessel engaged in laying, servicing or picking up a navigation mark, submarine cable, or pipeline;

? A vessel engaged in dredging, surveying, or underwater operations;

? A vessel engaged in replenishment or transferring persons, provisions, or cargo while underway;

? A vessel engaged in the launching or recovery of aircraft;

? A vessel engaged in mineclearance operations; and

? A vessel engaged in a towing operation such as severely restricts the towing vessel and her tow in their ability to deviate from their course.

"Visual distress signal" means any signalling device approved by the United States Coast Guard for use on recreational vessels.

"Water skiing" means the physical act of being towed behind a vessel on, but not limited to, any skis, aquaplane, kneeboard, tube, or any other similar device.

"Waters of the state" means any waters within the territorial limits of Washington state.

"Whistle" means any sound signaling appliance capable of producing the prescribed blasts and which complies with specifications found in Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81, Appendix A.

"Whitewater rivers of the state" means those rivers and streams, or parts thereof, within the boundaries of the state as listed in RCW 88.12.265 or as designated by the commission in WAC 352-60-140(2).

"Whitewater river outfitter" means any person who is advertising to carry or carries passengers for hire on any whitewater river of the state, but does not include any person whose only service on a given trip is providing instruction in canoeing or kayaking skills.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 88.12.279 and 43.51.400. 98-07-022, 352-60-020, filed 3/10/98, effective 4/10/98. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-020, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-020, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-030
Personal flotation devices required.
No person shall operate or permit the operation of a vessel on the waters of the state unless the vessel has on board United States Coast Guard approved personal flotation devices as follows:

(1) Vessels less than sixteen feet (4.9 meters) in length, and canoes and kayaks of any length, must have one Type I, II, or III PFD of the proper size for each person on board.

(2) Vessels sixteen feet (4.9 meters) or more in length, except a canoe or kayak, must have one Type I, II, or III wearable PFD of the proper size for each person on board and, in addition, one Type IV throwable PFD.

(3) Alternate PFD requirement. A United States Coast Guard approved Type V PFD may be carried in lieu of any required PFD under this section if it is approved for the activity in which the vessel is engaged in and used in compliance with requirements on the approval label.

(4) Stowage and condition. All personal flotation devices required by this section shall be readily accessible to all persons on board and be in good and serviceable condition. All devices shall be approved by the United States Coast Guard and marked in compliance with Coast Guard standards.

(5) Exemptions. Racing shells, rowing sculls and racing kayaks are exempt from the requirements of this section provided they are manually propelled, recognized by a national or international racing association and designed solely for competitive racing.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-030, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-030, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-040
Visual distress signals.
(1) Application. The requirements for this section apply to coastal waters.

(2) No person shall operate or permit the operation of a vessel unless visual distress signals are carried on board under the following conditions:

(a) For vessels sixteen feet (4.9 meters) or more in length, devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both day and night use must be carried on board.

(b) For vessels less than sixteen feet (4.9 meters) in length, visual distress signals for night use must be carried on board when operating between sunset and sunrise.

(3) Visual distress signals accepted. Any of the following signals as specified in Title 46, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 160, when carried in the number required, can be used to meet the requirements of this section:

(a) An electric distress light meeting the standards of Chapter 46, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 161.013. One is required to meet the night only requirement.

(b) An orange flag meeting the standards of Chapter 46, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 160.072. One is required to meet the day only requirement.

(c) Pyrotechnics meeting the standards noted in the table below:


Distress Signal

Description USCG Approval

Number Use Number

Required

Hand-Held Red Flare Signals 160.021 Day and Night 3
Floating Orange Smoke Signals 160.022 Day Only 3
Parachute Red Flare Signals 160.024 Day and Night 3
Hand-Held Rocket Propelled Parachute Red Flare Signals 160.036 Day and Night 3
Hand-Held Orange Smoke Signals 160.037 Day Only 3
Floating Orange Smoke Signals 160.057 Day Only 3
Red Aerial Pyrotechnic Flares 160.066 Day and Night 3



(4) Marking and stowage. Visual distress signals required by this section must be legibly marked with the United States Coast Guard approval number and must be readily accessible.

(5) Condition and expiration date. Visual distress signals required by this section must be in serviceable condition, and if marked with an expiration date, shall not be expired.

(6) Launchers. Any vessel that carries a visual distress signal required by this section where a launcher is necessary to activate the signal, must also have on board a launcher approved by the United States Coast Guard.

(7) Prohibited use. No person in a vessel shall display a visual distress signal on the waters of Washington state under any circumstance except a situation where assistance is needed because of immediate or potential danger to the persons on board.

(8) Exceptions. The following vessels, when operating between sunset and sunrise, must carry visual distress signals that meet the requirements of this section and are suitable for night use:

(a) A vessel competing in any organized marine parade, regatta, race or similar authorized event;

(b) A vessel being manually propelled; or

(c) A sailing vessel of completely open construction, less than twenty-six feet (7.9 meters) in length, and not equipped with propulsion machinery.

(9) Any combination of signal devices selected from the types noted in subsection (3)(a), (b) and (c) of this section, when carried in the number required, may be used to meet both day and night requirements. Examples - the combination of two hand-held red flares (160.021), and one parachute red flare (160.024 or 160.036) meets both day and night requirements. Three hand-held orange smoke (160.037) with one electric distress light (161.013) meet both day and night requirements.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-040, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-040, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-050
Ventilation.
(1) No person shall operate or permit to be operated any vessel having on board a gasoline engine used for any purpose, unless it shall be provided with proper ventilation.

(2) Compartments with gasoline engines. Each compartment in a vessel that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking motor must be open to the atmosphere, or be ventilated by a natural ventilation system and a mechanical exhaust blower system as required by the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971, as amended, and applicable federal regulations.

(3) Natural ventilation system. A natural ventilation system must be approved for use by the United States Coast Guard and include a supply opening or duct from the atmosphere or from a ventilated compartment or from a compartment that is open to the atmosphere, and an exhaust opening into another ventilated compartment or an exhaust duct to the atmosphere. Each exhaust opening or duct must originate in the lower third of the compartment; and each supply opening or duct and each exhaust opening or duct in a compartment must be above the normal accumulation of bilge water.

(4) Exhaust blowers. Each vessel that is required to have an exhaust blower must have a label that is located as close as practicable to each ignition switch, is in plain view of the operator, and has at least the following information: "WARNING - GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING ENGINE OPERATE BLOWER FOR FOUR (4) MINUTES AND CHECK ENGINE COMPARTMENT BILGE FOR GASOLINE VAPORS."

(5) In lieu of the ventilation and warning label required in this section, a vessel may be provided with any type of ventilating system as required by the Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971, as amended, and applicable federal regulations.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-050, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-050, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-060
Navigation lights and shapes.
The requirements of this section are equal to the rules established in Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 81 and 82.

Application.

(1) The requirements in this section shall be complied with in all weathers. The requirements concerning lights shall be complied with from sunset to sunrise, and during such times no other lights shall be exhibited, except such lights as cannot be mistaken for lights specified by the United States Coast Guard, or do not impair their visibility or distinctive character, or interfere with the keeping of a proper look-out. Lights and shapes shall meet the requirements for visibility, color, shape, and location as required by Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81-72, Appendix A, Rules 21, 22, and Annex I, as amended.

(2) The lights herein prescribed shall, if carried, also be exhibited from sunrise to sunset in restricted visibility and may be exhibited in all other circumstances when it is deemed necessary.

(3) The requirements concerning shapes shall be complied with by day.

(4)(a) Power-driven vessels underway - International waters.

(i) A power-driven vessel underway shall exhibit:

(A) A masthead light forward;

(B) A second masthead light abaft of and higher than the forward one; except that a vessel of less than fifty meters (164.0 feet) in length shall not be obliged to exhibit such light but may do so;

(C) Sidelights; and

(D) A sternlight.

(ii) An air-cushion vessel when operating in the nondisplacement mode shall, in addition to the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, exhibit an all-round flashing yellow light where it can best be seen.

(iii) A power-driven vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length may, in lieu of the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, exhibit an all-round white light and sidelights.

(A) A power-driven vessel of less than seven meters (23.0 feet) in length whose maximum speed does not exceed seven knots may in lieu of the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection exhibit an all-round white light and shall, if practicable, also exhibit sidelights;

(B) The masthead light or all-round white light on a power-driven vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length may be displaced from the fore and aft centerline of the vessel if centerline fitting is not practicable, provided that the sidelights are combined in one lantern which shall be carried on the fore and aft centerline of the vessel or located as nearly as practicable in the same fore and aft line as the masthead light or the all-round white light.

(b) Power-driven vessels underway - Inland waters.

(i) A power-driven vessel underway shall exhibit:

(A) A masthead light forward; except that a vessel of less than twenty meters (65.6 feet) in length need not exhibit this light forward of amidships but shall exhibit it as far forward as is practicable;

(B) A second masthead light abaft of and higher than the forward one; except that a vessel of less than fifty meters (164.0 feet) in length shall not be obliged to exhibit such light but may do so;

(C) Sidelights; and

(D) A sternlight.

(ii) An air-cushion vessel when operating in the nondisplacement mode shall, in addition to the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, exhibit an all-round flashing yellow light where it can best be seen.

(iii) A power-driven vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length may, in lieu of the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, exhibit an all-round white light and sidelights.

(5) Towing and pushing.

(a) International waters.

(i) A power-driven vessel when towing astern shall exhibit:

(A) Instead of the light prescribed either in subsection (4)(a)(i)(A) or (B) of this section, two masthead lights in a vertical line. When the length of the tow, measuring from stern of the towing vessel to the after end of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), three such lights in a vertical line;

(B) Sidelights;

(C) A sternlight;

(D) A towing light in a vertical line above the sternlight; and

(E) When the length of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), a diamond shape where it can best be seen.

(ii) When a pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead are rigidly connected in a composite unit they shall be regarded as a power-driven vessel and exhibit the lights prescribed in subsection (4)(a) of this section.

(iii) A power-driven vessel when pushing ahead or towing alongside, except in the case of a composite unit, shall exhibit:

(A) Instead of the light prescribed in subsection (4)(a)(i)(A) or (B) of this section, two masthead lights in a vertical line;

(B) Sidelights,

(C) A sternlight.

(iv) A power-driven vessel to which (a)(i) or (iii) of this subsection apply shall also comply with subsection (4)(a)(i)(B) of this section.

(v) A vessel or object being towed, other than those mentioned in (a)(vii) of this subsection, shall exhibit:

(A) Sidelights;

(B) A sternlight;

(C) When the length of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), a diamond shape where it can best be seen.

(vi) Provided that any number of vessels being towed alongside or pushed in a group shall be lighted as one vessel.

(A) A vessel being pushed ahead, not being part of a composite unit, shall exhibit at the forward end sidelights;

(B) A vessel being towed alongside shall exhibit a sternlight and at the forward end, sidelights.

(vii) An inconspicuous, partly submerged vessel or object being towed shall exhibit:

(A) If it is less than twenty-five meters (82.0 feet) in breadth, one all-round white light at or near the forward end and one at or near the after end except that dracones need not exhibit a light at or near the forward end;

(B) If it is twenty-five meters (82.0 feet) or more in breadth, two additional all-round white lights at or near the extremities of its breadth;

(C) If it exceeds one hundred meters (328.1 feet) in length, additional all-round white lights between the lights prescribed in (a)(vii)(A) and (B) of this subsection so that the distance between the lights shall not exceed 100 meters (328.1 feet);

(D) A diamond shape at or near the aftermost extremity of the last vessel or object being towed; and if the length of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet) an additional diamond shape where it can best be seen and located as far forward as is practicable.

(viii) Where from any sufficient cause it is impracticable for a vessel or object being towed to exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in (a)(v) or (vii) of this subsection, all possible measures shall be taken to light the vessel or object towed or at least to indicate the presence of such vessel or object.

(ix) Where from any sufficient cause it is impracticable for a vessel not normally engaged in towing operations to display the lights or shapes prescribed by (a)(i) or (iii) of this subsection, such vessel shall not be required to exhibit those lights when engaged in towing another vessel in distress or otherwise in need of assistance. All possible measures shall be taken to indicate the nature of the relationship between the towing vessel and the vessel being towed as authorized by WAC 352-60-066(5), in particular by illuminating the towline.

(b) Inland waters.

(i) A power-driven vessel when towing astern shall exhibit:

(A) Instead of the light prescribed either in subsection (4)(b)(i)(A) or (B) of this section, two masthead lights in a vertical line. When the length of the tow, measuring from stern to the towing vessel to the after end of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), three such lights in a vertical line;

(B) Sidelights;

(C) A sternlight;

(D) A towing light in a vertical line above the sternlight; and

(E) When the length of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), a diamond shape where it can best be seen.

(ii) When a pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead are rigidly connected in a composite unit they shall be regarded as a power-driven vessel and exhibit the lights prescribed in subsection (4)(b) of this section.

(iii) A power-driven vessel when pushing ahead or towing alongside, except as required by (b)(ii) of this subsection, shall exhibit:

(A) Instead of the light prescribed either in subsection (4)(b)(i)(A) or (B) of this section, two masthead lights in a vertical line;

(B) Sidelights; and

(C) Two towing lights in a vertical line.

(iv) A power-driven vessel to which (b)(i) or (iii) of this subsection apply shall also comply with subsection (4)(b)(i)(A) and (B) of this section.

(v) A vessel or object other than those referred to in (b)(vii) of this subsection being towed shall exhibit:

(A) Sidelights;

(B) A sternlight; and

(C) When the length of the tow exceeds two hundred meters (656.2 feet), a diamond shape where it can best be seen.

(vi) Provided that any number of vessels being towed alongside or pushed in a group shall be lighted as one vessel:

(A) A vessel being pushed ahead, not being part of a composite unit, shall exhibit at the forward end sidelights, and a special flashing light; and

(B) A vessel being towed alongside shall exhibit a sternlight and at the forward end sidelights.

(vii) An inconspicuous, partly submerged vessel or object being towed shall exhibit:

(A) If it is less than twenty-five meters (82.0 feet) in breadth, one all-round white light at or near each end;

(B) If it is twenty-five meters (82.0 feet) or more in breadth, four all-round white lights to mark its length and breadth;

(C) If it exceeds one hundred meters (328.1 feet) in length, additional all-round white lights between the lights prescribed in (b)(vii)(A) and (B) of this subsection so that the distance between the lights shall not exceed one hundred meters (328.1 feet): Provided, That any vessels or objects being towed alongside each other shall be lighted as one vessel or object;

(D) A diamond shape at or near the aftermost extremity of the last vessel or object being towed; and

(E) The towing vessel may direct a searchlight in the direction of the tow to indicate its presence to an approaching vessel.

(viii) Where from any sufficient cause it is impracticable for a vessel or object being towed to exhibit the lights prescribed in (b)(v) or (vii) of this subsection, all possible measures shall be taken to light the vessel or object towed or at least to indicate the presence of the unlighted vessel or object.

(ix) Where from any sufficient cause it is impracticable for a vessel not normally engaged in towing operations to display the lights prescribed by (b)(i) or (iii) of this subsection, such vessel shall not be required to exhibit those lights when engaged in towing another vessel in distress or otherwise in need of assistance. All possible measures shall be taken to indicate the nature of the relationship between the towing vessel and the vessel being assisted. The searchlight authorized by WAC 352-60-066(5) may be used to illuminate the tow.

(6) Sailing vessels underway and vessels under oars - International and inland waters.

(a) A sailing vessel underway shall exhibit:

(i) Sidelights; and

(ii) A sternlight.

(b) In a sailing vessel of less than twenty meters (65.6 feet) in length the lights prescribed in (a) of this subsection may be combined in one lantern carried at or near the top of the mast where it can best be seen.

(c) A sailing vessel underway may, in addition to the lights prescribed in (a) of this subsection, exhibit at or near the top of the mast, where they can best be seen, two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being red and the lower green, but these lights shall not be exhibited in conjunction with the combined lantern permitted by (b) of this subsection.

(d)(i) A sailing vessel of less than seven meters (23.0 feet) in length shall, if practicable, exhibit the lights prescribed in (a) or (b) of this subsection, but if she does not, she shall have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light which shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision.

(ii) A vessel under oars may exhibit the lights prescribed in this subsection for sailing vessels, but if she does not, she shall have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light which shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision.

(e) A vessel proceeding under sail when also being propelled by machinery shall exhibit forward where it can best be seen a conical shape, apex downward: Provided, That for inland waters only, a vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length is not required to exhibit this shape, but may do so.

(7) Fishing vessels - International and inland waters.

(a) A vessel engaged in fishing, whether underway or at anchor, shall exhibit only the lights and shapes prescribed in this subsection.

(b) A vessel when engaged in trawling, by which is meant the dragging through the water of a dredge net or other apparatus used as a fishing appliance, shall exhibit:

(i) Two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being green and the lower white, or a shape consisting of two cones with their apexes together in a vertical line one above the other; a vessel of less than twenty meters (65.6 feet) in length may instead of this shape exhibit a basket;

(ii) A masthead light abaft of and higher than the all-round green light; a vessel of less than fifty meters (164.0 feet) in length shall not be obliged to exhibit such a light but may do so; and

(iii) When making way through the water, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, sidelights and a sternlight.

(c) A vessel engaged in fishing, other than trawling, shall exhibit:

(i) Two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being red and the lower white, or a shape consisting of two cones with apexes together in a vertical line one above the other; a vessel of less than twenty meters (65.6 feet) in length may instead of this shape exhibit a basket;

(ii) When there is outlying gear extending more than one hundred fifty meters (492.1 feet) horizontally from the vessel, an all-round white light or a cone apex upward in the direction of the gear; and

(iii) When making way through the water, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, sidelights and a sternlight.

(d) A vessel engaged in fishing in close proximity to other vessels engaged in fishing may exhibit the additional signals as found in Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81, Annex II and Part 85, Annex II.

(e) A vessel when not engaged in fishing shall not exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in this subsection, but only those prescribed for a vessel of her length.

(8) Vessels not under command or restricted in their ability to maneuver - International and inland waters.

(a) A vessel not under command shall exhibit:

(i) Two all-round red lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen;

(ii) Two balls or similar shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen; and

(iii) When making way through the water, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, sidelights and a sternlight.

(b) A vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver, except a vessel engaged in mineclearance operations, shall exhibit:

(i) Three all-round lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red and the middle light shall be white;

(ii) Three shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen. The highest and lowest of these shapes shall be balls and the middle one a diamond;

(iii) When making way through the water, a masthead light or lights, sidelights and a sternlight, in addition to the lights prescribed in (b)(i) of this subsection; and

(iv) When at anchor, in addition to the lights or shapes prescribed in (b)(i) and (ii) of this subsection, the light, lights or shapes prescribed in subsection (11) of this section.

(c) A vessel engaged in a towing operation which severely restricts the towing vessel and her tow in their ability to deviate from their course shall exhibit:

(i) For inland waters, in addition to the lights or shapes prescribed in (b)(i) and (ii) of this subsection, exhibit the lights or shape prescribed in WAC 352-60-066 (5)(b);

(ii) For international waters, in addition to the lights or shapes prescribed in subsection (5)(a)(i) of this section, exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in (b)(i) and (ii) of this subsection.

(d) A vessel engaged in dredging or underwater operations, when restricted in her ability to maneuver, shall exhibit the lights and shapes prescribed in (b)(i), (ii), and (iii) of this subsection and shall in addition, when an obstruction exists, exhibit:

(i) Two all-round red lights or two balls in a vertical line to indicate the side on which the obstruction exists;

(ii) Two all-round green lights or two diamonds in a vertical line to indicate the side on which another vessel may pass; and

(iii) When at anchor, the lights or shape prescribed by this paragraph, instead of the lights or shapes prescribed in subsection (11) of this section for anchored vessels.

(e) Whenever the size of a vessel engaged in diving operations makes it impracticable to exhibit all lights and shapes prescribed in (d) of this subsection, the following shall be exhibited:

(i) Three all-round lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red and the middle light shall be white;

(ii) A rigid replica of the International Code flag "A" not less than one meter (3.3 feet) in height. Measures shall be taken to insure its all-round visibility.

(f) A vessel engaged in mineclearance operations shall in addition to the lights prescribed for a power-driven vessel in subsection (4) of this section or to the lights or shape prescribed for a vessel at anchor in subsection (11) of this section as appropriate, exhibit three all-round green lights or three balls. One of these lights or shapes shall be exhibited near the foremast head and one at each end of the fore yard. These lights or shapes indicate that it is dangerous for another vessel to approach within one thousand meters (3280.8 feet) of the mineclearance vessel.

(g) A vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length, except when engaged in diving operations, is not required to exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in this subsection.

(h) The signals prescribed in this subsection are not signals of vessels in distress and requiring assistance. Such signals are contained in Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 87, Annex IV: Distress Signals.

(9) Vessels constrained by their draft - International waters. A vessel constrained by her draft may, in addition to the lights prescribed for power-driven vessels in subsection (4)(a) of this section, exhibit where they can best be seen three all-round red lights in a vertical line, or a cylinder.

(10) Pilot vessels - International and inland waters.

(a) A vessel engaged on pilotage duty shall exhibit:

(i) At or near the masthead, two all-round lights in a vertical line, the upper being white and the lower red;

(ii) When underway, in addition, sidelights and a sternlight; and

(iii) When at anchor, in addition to the lights prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, the anchor light, lights, or shape prescribed in subsection (11) of this section for anchored vessels.

(b) A pilot vessel when not engaged on pilotage duty shall exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed for a vessel of her length.

(11) Anchored vessels and vessels aground - International and inland waters.

(a) A vessel at anchor shall exhibit where it can best be seen:

(i) In the fore part, an all-round white light or one ball; and

(ii) At or near the stern and at a lower level than the light prescribed in (a)(i) of this subsection, an all-round white light.

(b) A vessel of less than fifty meters (164.0 feet) in length may exhibit an all-round white light where it can best be seen instead of the lights prescribed in (a) of this subsection.

(c) A vessel at anchor may, and a vessel of one hundred meters (328.1 feet) or more in length shall, also use the available working or equivalent lights to illuminate her decks.

(d) A vessel aground shall exhibit the lights prescribed in (a) or (b) of this subsection and in addition, where they can best be seen:

(i) Two all-round red lights in a vertical line; and

(ii) Three balls in a vertical line.

(e) A vessel of less than seven meters (23.0 feet) in length, when at anchor, not in or near a narrow channel, fairway, anchorage, or where other vessels normally navigate, shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shape prescribed in (a) and (b) of this subsection.

(f) A vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length when aground shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in (d)(i) and (ii) of this subsection.

(g) For inland waters only, a vessel of less than twenty meters (65.6 feet) in length, when at anchor in a special anchorage area designated by the United States Coast Guard, shall not be required to exhibit the anchor lights and shapes required by this subsection.

(12) Seaplanes - International and inland waters. Where it is impracticable for a seaplane to exhibit lights and shapes of the characteristics or in the positions prescribed in the requirements section she shall exhibit lights and shapes as closely similar in characteristics and position as is possible.

(13) Law enforcement vessels - Inland waters.

(a) Law enforcement vessels may display a flashing blue light when engaged in direct law enforcement or public safety activities. This light must be located so that it does not interfere with the visibility of the vessel's navigation lights.

(b) The blue light described in this subsection may only be displayed by law enforcement vessels of the United States, Washington, and its political subdivisions. The use of blue lights by other vessels is prohibited.

(14) Public safety activities - Inland waters.

(a) Vessels engaged in government sanctioned public safety activities, and commercial vessels performing similar functions, may display an alternately flashing red and yellow light signal. This identification light signal must be located so that it does not interfere with the visibility of the vessel's navigation lights. The identification light signal may be used only as an identification signal and conveys no special privilege. Vessels using the identification light signal during public safety activities must abide by the rules found in WAC 352-60-060, 352-60-065, 352-60-066, and 352-60-070, and must not presume that the light or the exigency gives them precedence or right of way.

(b) Public safety activities include but are not limited to patrolling marine parades, regattas, or special water celebrations; traffic control; salvage; fire fighting; medical assistance; assisting disabled vessels; and search and rescue.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-060, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94. Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400. 84-11-057 (Order 79), 352-60-060, filed 5/18/84.]




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352-60-065
Sound producing devices.
No person shall operate, or permit to be operated, a vessel on the waters of this state without sound producing devices as follows:

(1) A vessel of twelve meters (39.4 feet) or more in length shall be provided with a whistle and a bell and a vessel of one hundred meters (328.1 feet) or more in length shall, in addition, be provided with a gong, the tone and sound of which cannot be confused with that of the bell. The whistle, bell and gong shall comply with Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 86. The bell or gong, or both, may be replaced by other equipment having the same respective sound characteristics, provided that manual sounding of the prescribed signals shall always be possible.

(2) A vessel of less than twelve meters (39.4 feet) in length shall not be obliged to carry the sound signaling appliances prescribed in subsection (1) of this section, but if she does not, she shall be provided with some other means of making an efficient sound signal.



[Statutory Authority: RCW 43.51.400, 88.12.065, 88.12.125, 88.12.245 and chapter 33, CFR Part 175.15. 94-16-027, 352-60-065, filed 7/25/94, effective 8/25/94.]




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352-60-066
Sound and light signals.
For the purposes of this section, the term "short blast" means a blast of about one second's duration, and the term "prolonged blast" means a blast of from four to six seconds' duration.

(1) Maneuvering and warning signals - International waters.

(a) When vessels are in sight of one another, a power-driven vessel underway, when maneuvering as authorized or required by these requirements, shall indicate that maneuver by the following signals on her whistle:

- One short blast to mean "I am altering my course to starboard";

- Two short blasts to mean "I am altering my course to port";

- Three short blasts to mean "I am operating astern propulsion."

(b) Any vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in (a) of this subsection by light signals, repeated as appropriate, whilst the maneuver is being carried out:

(i) These light signals shall have the following significance:

- One flash to mean "I am altering my course to starboard";

- Two flashes to mean "I am altering my course to port";

- Three flashes to mean "I am operating astern propulsion";

(ii) The duration of each flash shall be about one second, the interval between flashes shall be about one second, and the interval between successive signals shall be not less than ten seconds;

(iii) The light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be an all-round white light, visible at a minimum range of five miles, and shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 81, Appendix A, Annex I.

(c) When in sight of one another in a narrow channel or fairway:

(i) A vessel intending to overtake another shall in compliance with WAC 352-60-070 (6)(e)(i) indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle:

- Two prolonged blasts followed by one short blast to mean "I intend to overtake you on your starboard side";

- Two prolonged blasts followed by two short blasts to mean "I intend to overtake you on your port side";

(ii) The vessel about to be overtaken when acting in accordance with WAC 352-60-070 (6)(e)(i) shall indicate her agreement by the following signal on her whistle:

- One prolonged, one short, one prolonged and one short blast, in that order.

(d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the intentions or actions of the other, or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision, the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. Such signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes.

(e) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a channel or fairway where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruction shall sound one prolonged blast. Such signal shall be answered with a prolonged blast by any approaching vessel that may be within hearing around the bend or behind the intervening obstruction.

(f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than one hundred meters (328.1 feet), one whistle only shall be used for giving maneuvering and warning signals.

(2) Maneuvering and warning signals - Inland waters.

(a) When power-driven vessels are in sight of one another and meeting or crossing at a distance within one-half mile of each other, each vessel underway, when maneuvering as authorized or required by these requirements:

(i) Shall indicate that maneuver by the following signals on her whistle:

- One short blast to mean "I intend to leave you on my port side";

- Two short blasts to mean "I intend to leave you on my starboard side"; and

- Three short blasts to mean "I am operating astern propulsion."

(ii) Upon hearing the one or two blast signal the other shall, if in agreement, sound the same whistle signal and take the steps necessary to effect a safe passing. If, however, from any cause, the vessel doubts the safety of the proposed maneuver, she shall sound the danger signal specified in (d) of this subsection and each vessel shall take appropriate precautionary action until a safe passing agreement is made.

(b) A vessel may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in (a) of this subsection by light signals:

(i) These signals shall have the following significance:

- One flash to mean "I intend to leave you on my port side";

- Two flashes to mean "I intend to leave you on my starboard side";

- Three flashes to mean "I am operating astern propulsion";

(ii) The duration of each flash shall be about one second; and

(iii) The light used for this signal shall, if fitted, be one all-around white or yellow light, visible at a minimum range of two miles (3219.1 meters), synchronized with the whistle, and shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 33, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 84, Annex I.

(c) When in sight of one another:

(i) A power-driven vessel intending to overtake another power-driven vessel shall indicate her intention by the following signals on her whistle:

- One short blast to mean "I intend to overtake you on your starboard side";

- Two short blasts to mean "I intend to overtake you on your port side"; and

(ii) The power-driven vessel about to be overtaken shall, if in agreement, sound a similar sound signal. If in doubt she shall sound the danger signal prescribed in (d) of this subsection.

(d) When vessels in sight of one another are approaching each other and from any cause either vessel fails to understand the intentions or actions of the other, or is in doubt whether sufficient action is being taken by the other to avoid collision, the vessel in doubt shall immediately indicate such doubt by giving at least five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. This signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid flashes.

(e) A vessel nearing a bend or an area of a channel or fairway where other vessels may be obscured by an intervening obstruction shall sound one prolonged blast. This signal shall be answered with a prolonged blast by any approaching vessel that may be within hearing around the bend or behind the intervening obstruction.

(f) If whistles are fitted on a vessel at a distance apart of more than one hundred meters (328.1 feet), one whistle only shall be used for giving maneuvering and warning signals.

(g) When a power-driven vessel is leaving a dock or berth, she shall sound one prolonged blast.

(h) A vessel that reaches agreement with another vessel in a meeting, crossing, or overtaking situation by using the radiotelephone as prescribed by the Federal Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act (85 Stat. 165; 33 U.S.C. 1207), is not obliged to sound the whistle signals prescribed by this subsection, but may do so. If agreement is not reached, then whistle signals shall be exchanged in a timely manner and shall prevail.

(3) Sound signals in restricted visibility - International waters. In or near an area of restricted visibility, whether by day or night, the signals prescribed in this subsection shall be used as follows:

(a) A power-driven vessel making way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than two minutes, one prolonged blast.

(b) A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making no way through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than two minutes, two prolonged blasts in succession with an interval of about two seconds between them.

(c) A vessel not under command, a vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver, a sailing vessel, a vessel engaged in fishing and a vessel engaged in towing or pushing another vessel shall, instead of the signals prescribed in (a) or (b) of this subsection, sound at intervals of not more than two minutes, three blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by two short blasts. (continued)