CCLME.ORG - Oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and response.
Loading (50 kb)...'
State
Washington
Chapter 90.56 RCW Oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and response

Chapter 90.56 RCW
Oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and response


Notes:
Environmental certification programs -- Fees -- Rules -- Liability: RCW 43.21A.175.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.005
Findings Purpose.
(1) The legislature declares that water borne transportation as a source of supply for oil and hazardous substances poses special concern for the state of Washington. Each year billions of gallons of crude oil and refined petroleum products are transported as cargo and fuel by vessels on the navigable waters of the state. These shipments are expected to increase in the coming years. Vessels transporting oil into Washington travel on some of the most unique and special marine environments in the United States. These marine environments are a source of natural beauty, recreation, and economic livelihood for many residents of this state. As a result, the state has an obligation to ensure the citizens of the state that the waters of the state will be protected from oil spills.

(2) The legislature finds that prevention is the best method to protect the unique and special marine environments in this state. The technology for containing and cleaning up a spill of oil or hazardous substances is at best only partially effective. Preventing spills is more protective of the environment and more cost-effective when all the response and damage costs associated with responding to a spill are considered. Therefore, the legislature finds that the primary objective of the state is to achieve a zero spills strategy to prevent any oil or hazardous substances from entering waters of the state.

(3) The legislature also finds that:

(a) Recent accidents in Washington, Alaska, southern California, Texas, Pennsylvania, and other parts of the nation have shown that the transportation, transfer, and storage of oil have caused significant damage to the marine environment;

(b) Even with the best efforts, it is nearly impossible to remove all oil that is spilled into the water, and average removal rates are only fourteen percent;

(c) Washington's navigable waters are treasured environmental and economic resources that the state cannot afford to place at undue risk from an oil spill;

(d) The state has a fundamental responsibility, as the trustee of the state's natural resources and the protector of public health and the environment to prevent the spill of oil; and

(e) In section 5002 of the federal oil pollution act of 1990, the United States congress found that many people believed that complacency on the part of industry and government was one of the contributing factors to the Exxon Valdez spill and, further, that one method to combat this complacency is to involve local citizens in the monitoring and oversight of oil spill plans. Congress also found that a mechanism should be established that fosters the long-term partnership of industry, government, and local communities in overseeing compliance with environmental concerns in the operation of crude oil terminals. Moreover, congress concluded that, in addition to Alaska, a program of citizen monitoring and oversight should be established in other major crude oil terminals in the United States because recent oil spills indicate that the safe transportation of oil is a national problem.

(4) In order to establish a comprehensive prevention and response program to protect Washington's waters and natural resources from spills of oil, it is the purpose of this chapter:

(a) To establish state agency expertise in marine safety and to centralize state activities in spill prevention and response activities;

(b) To prevent spills of oil and to promote programs that reduce the risk of both catastrophic and small chronic spills;

(c) To ensure that responsible parties are liable, and have the resources and ability, to respond to spills and provide compensation for all costs and damages;

(d) To provide for state spill response and wildlife rescue planning and implementation;

(e) To support and complement the federal oil pollution act of 1990 and other federal law, especially those provisions relating to the national contingency plan for cleanup of oil spills and discharges, including provisions relating to the responsibilities of state agencies designated as natural resource trustees. The legislature intends this chapter to be interpreted and implemented in a manner consistent with federal law;

(f) To provide broad powers of regulation to the department of ecology relating to spill prevention and response;

(g) To provide for an independent oil spill advisory council to review on an ongoing basis the adequacy of oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response activities in this state; and

(h) To provide an adequate funding source for state response and prevention programs.


[2005 c 304 1; 2004 c 226 2; 1991 c 200 101; 1990 c 116 1.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.010
Definitions.
For purposes of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply unless the context indicates otherwise:

(1) "Best achievable protection" means the highest level of protection that can be achieved through the use of the best achievable technology and those staffing levels, training procedures, and operational methods that provide the greatest degree of protection achievable. The director's determination of best achievable protection shall be guided by the critical need to protect the state's natural resources and waters, while considering (a) the additional protection provided by the measures; (b) the technological achievability of the measures; and (c) the cost of the measures.

(2) "Best achievable technology" means the technology that provides the greatest degree of protection taking into consideration (a) processes that are being developed, or could feasibly be developed, given overall reasonable expenditures on research and development, and (b) processes that are currently in use. In determining what is best achievable technology, the director shall consider the effectiveness, engineering feasibility, and commercial availability of the technology.

(3) "Board" means the pollution control hearings board.

(4) "Cargo vessel" means a self-propelled ship in commerce, other than a tank vessel or a passenger vessel, three hundred or more gross tons, including but not limited to, commercial fish processing vessels and freighters.

(5) "Bulk" means material that is stored or transported in a loose, unpackaged liquid, powder, or granular form capable of being conveyed by a pipe, bucket, chute, or belt system.

(6) "Committee" means the preassessment screening committee established under RCW 90.48.368.

(7) "Covered vessel" means a tank vessel, cargo vessel, or passenger vessel.

(8) "Department" means the department of ecology.

(9) "Director" means the director of the department of ecology.

(10) "Discharge" means any spilling, leaking, pumping, pouring, emitting, emptying, or dumping.

(11)(a) "Facility" means any structure, group of structures, equipment, pipeline, or device, other than a vessel, located on or near the navigable waters of the state that transfers oil in bulk to or from a tank vessel or pipeline, that is used for producing, storing, handling, transferring, processing, or transporting oil in bulk.

(b) A facility does not include any: (i) Railroad car, motor vehicle, or other rolling stock while transporting oil over the highways or rail lines of this state; (ii) underground storage tank regulated by the department or a local government under chapter 90.76 RCW; (iii) motor vehicle motor fuel outlet; (iv) facility that is operated as part of an exempt agricultural activity as provided in RCW 82.04.330; or (v) marine fuel outlet that does not dispense more than three thousand gallons of fuel to a ship that is not a covered vessel, in a single transaction.

(12) "Fund" means the state coastal protection fund as provided in RCW 90.48.390 and 90.48.400.

(13) "Having control over oil" shall include but not be limited to any person using, storing, or transporting oil immediately prior to entry of such oil into the waters of the state, and shall specifically include carriers and bailees of such oil.

(14) "Marine facility" means any facility used for tank vessel wharfage or anchorage, including any equipment used for the purpose of handling or transferring oil in bulk to or from a tank vessel.

(15) "Navigable waters of the state" means those waters of the state, and their adjoining shorelines, that are subject to the ebb and flow of the tide and/or are presently used, have been used in the past, or may be susceptible for use to transport intrastate, interstate, or foreign commerce.

(16) "Necessary expenses" means the expenses incurred by the department and assisting state agencies for (a) investigating the source of the discharge; (b) investigating the extent of the environmental damage caused by the discharge; (c) conducting actions necessary to clean up the discharge; (d) conducting predamage and damage assessment studies; and (e) enforcing the provisions of this chapter and collecting for damages caused by a discharge.

(17) "Oil" or "oils" means naturally occurring liquid hydrocarbons at atmospheric temperature and pressure coming from the earth, including condensate and natural gasoline, and any fractionation thereof, including, but not limited to, crude oil, petroleum, gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, oil sludge, oil refuse, and oil mixed with wastes other than dredged spoil. Oil does not include any substance listed in Table 302.4 of 40 C.F.R. Part 302 adopted August 14, 1989, under section 101(14) of the federal comprehensive environmental response, compensation, and liability act of 1980, as amended by P.L. 99-499.

(18) "Offshore facility" means any facility located in, on, or under any of the navigable waters of the state, but does not include a facility any part of which is located in, on, or under any land of the state, other than submerged land.

(19) "Onshore facility" means any facility any part of which is located in, on, or under any land of the state, other than submerged land, that because of its location, could reasonably be expected to cause substantial harm to the environment by discharging oil into or on the navigable waters of the state or the adjoining shorelines.

(20)(a) "Owner or operator" means (i) in the case of a vessel, any person owning, operating, or chartering by demise, the vessel; (ii) in the case of an onshore or offshore facility, any person owning or operating the facility; and (iii) in the case of an abandoned vessel or onshore or offshore facility, the person who owned or operated the vessel or facility immediately before its abandonment.

(b) "Operator" does not include any person who owns the land underlying a facility if the person is not involved in the operations of the facility.

(21) "Passenger vessel" means a ship of three hundred or more gross tons with a fuel capacity of at least six thousand gallons carrying passengers for compensation.

(22) "Person" means any political subdivision, government agency, municipality, industry, public or private corporation, copartnership, association, firm, individual, or any other entity whatsoever.

(23) "Ship" means any boat, ship, vessel, barge, or other floating craft of any kind.

(24) "Spill" means an unauthorized discharge of oil or hazardous substances into the waters of the state.

(25) "Tank vessel" means a ship that is constructed or adapted to carry, or that carries, oil in bulk as cargo or cargo residue, and that:

(a) Operates on the waters of the state; or

(b) Transfers oil in a port or place subject to the jurisdiction of this state.

(26) "Waters of the state" includes lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, inland waters, underground water, salt waters, estuaries, tidal flats, beaches and lands adjoining the seacoast of the state, sewers, and all other surface waters and watercourses within the jurisdiction of the state of Washington.

(27) "Worst case spill" means: (a) In the case of a vessel, a spill of the entire cargo and fuel of the vessel complicated by adverse weather conditions; and (b) in the case of an onshore or offshore facility, the largest foreseeable spill in adverse weather conditions.


[2000 c 69 15; 1992 c 73 31; 1991 c 200 102; 1990 c 116 2; 1989 c 388 6; 1985 c 316 5; 1971 ex.s. c 180 1; 1970 ex.s. c 88 1; 1969 ex.s. c 133 10. Formerly RCW 90.48.315.]

Notes: Effective dates -- 1992 c 73: See RCW 82.23B.902.

Findings -- Severability -- 1990 c 116: See notes following RCW 90.56.210.


Intent -- 1989 c 388: "The legislature finds that oil spills can cause significant damage to the environment and natural resources held in trust by and for the people of this state. Some of these damages are unquantifiable, and others cannot be quantified at a reasonable cost. Both quantifiable and unquantifiable damages often occur despite prompt containment and cleanup measures. Due to the inability to measure the exact nature and extent of certain types of damages, current damage assessment methodologies used by the state inadequately assess the damage caused by oil spills.

In light of the magnitude of environmental and natural resource damage which may be caused by oil spills, and the importance of fishing, tourism, recreation, and Washington's natural abundance and beauty to the quality of life and economic future of the people of this state, the legislature declares that compensation should be sought for those damages that cannot be quantified at a reasonable cost and for those unquantifiable damages that result from oil spills. This compensation is intended to ensure that the public does not bear substantial losses caused by oil pollution for which compensation may not otherwise be received." [1989 c 388 1.]


Application -- 1989 c 388: "This act applies prospectively only, and not retroactively. It applies only to causes of action which arise after May 13, 1989." [1989 c 388 12.]


Captions not law -- 1989 c 388: "Section headings as used in this act do not constitute any part of the law." [1989 c 388 13.]


Severability -- 1989 c 388: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [1989 c 388 14.]


Severability -- 1969 ex.s. c 133: "If any provision of this 1969 act or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, this 1969 act can be given effect without the invalid provision or application; and to this end the provisions of this 1969 act are declared to be severable. This 1969 act shall be liberally construed to effectuate its purpose." [1969 ex.s. c 133 12.]


Marine oil pollution -- Baseline study program: RCW 43.21A.405 through 43.21A.420.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.020
Director responsible for spill response.
Except as otherwise specifically provided in this chapter or other law, the director has the primary authority, in conformance with the statewide master oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and contingency plan adopted pursuant to RCW 90.56.060 and any applicable contingency plans prepared pursuant to this chapter and chapter 88.46 RCW, to oversee prevention, abatement, response, containment, and cleanup efforts with regard to any oil or hazardous substance spill in the navigable waters of the state. The director is the head of the state incident command system in response to a spill of oil or hazardous substances and shall coordinate the response efforts of all state agencies and local emergency response personnel. If a discharge of oil or hazardous substances is subject to the national contingency plan, in responding to the discharge, the director shall to the greatest extent practicable act in accordance with the national contingency plan and cooperate with the federal on-scene coordinator or other federal agency or official exercising authority under the national contingency plan.


[1991 c 200 103.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.030
Powers and duties.
The powers, duties, and functions conferred by this chapter shall be exercised by the department of ecology and shall be deemed an essential government function in the exercise of the police power of the state. Such powers, duties, and functions of the department shall extend to all waters under the jurisdiction of the state.


[1991 c 200 104; 1971 ex.s. c 180 2. Formerly RCW 90.48.370.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.040
Authority supplemental.
This chapter grants authority to the department which is supplemental to and in no way reduces or otherwise modifies the powers granted to the department by other statutes.


[1991 c 200 105; 1987 c 109 153; 1969 ex.s. c 133 11. Formerly RCW 90.48.365.]

Notes: Purpose -- Short title -- Construction -- Rules -- Severability -- Captions -- 1987 c 109: See notes following RCW 43.21B.001.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.050
Rules.
The department may adopt rules including but not limited to the following matters:

(1) Procedures and methods of reporting discharges and other occurrences prohibited by this chapter;

(2) Procedures, methods, means, and equipment to be used by persons subject to regulation by this chapter and such rules may prescribe the times, places, and methods of transfer of oil;

(3) Coordination of procedures, methods, means, and equipment to be used in the removal of oil;

(4) Development and implementation of criteria and plans to meet oil spills of various kinds and degrees;

(5) When and under what circumstances, if any, chemical agents, such as coagulants, dispersants, and bioremediation, may be used in response to an oil spill;

(6) The disposal of oil recovered from a spill; and

(7) Such other rules and regulations as the exigencies of any condition may require or such as may be reasonably necessary to carry out the intent of this chapter.


[1991 c 200 106; 1971 ex.s. c 180 3. Formerly RCW 90.48.380.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.060
Statewide master oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and contingency plan Evaluation and revision or elimination of advisory committees.
(1) The department shall prepare and annually update a statewide master oil and hazardous substance spill prevention and contingency plan. In preparing the plan, the department shall consult with an advisory committee representing diverse interests concerned with oil and hazardous substance spills, including the United States coast guard, the federal environmental protection agency, state agencies, local governments, port districts, private facilities, environmental organizations, oil companies, shipping companies, containment and cleanup contractors, tow companies, hazardous substance manufacturers, and with the oil spill advisory council.

(2) The state master plan prepared under this section shall at a minimum:

(a) Take into consideration the elements of oil spill prevention and contingency plans approved or submitted for approval pursuant to this chapter and chapter 88.46 RCW and oil and hazardous substance spill contingency plans prepared pursuant to other state or federal law or prepared by federal agencies and regional entities;

(b) State the respective responsibilities as established by relevant statutes and rules of each of the following in the prevention of and the assessment, containment, and cleanup of a worst case spill of oil or hazardous substances into the environment of the state: (i) State agencies; (ii) local governments; (iii) appropriate federal agencies; (iv) facility operators; (v) property owners whose land or other property may be affected by the oil or hazardous substance spill; and (vi) other parties identified by the department as having an interest in or the resources to assist in the containment and cleanup of an oil or hazardous substance spill;

(c) State the respective responsibilities of the parties identified in (b) of this subsection in an emergency response;

(d) Identify actions necessary to reduce the likelihood of spills of oil and hazardous substances;

(e) Identify and obtain mapping of environmentally sensitive areas at particular risk to oil and hazardous substance spills;

(f) Establish an incident command system for responding to oil and hazardous substances spills; and

(g) Establish a process for immediately notifying affected tribes of any oil spill.

(3) In preparing and updating the state master plan, the department shall:

(a) Consult with federal, provincial, municipal, and community officials, other state agencies, the state of Oregon, and with representatives of affected regional organizations;

(b) Submit the draft plan to the public for review and comment;

(c) Submit to the appropriate standing committees of the legislature for review, not later than November 1st of each year, the plan and any annual revision of the plan; and

(d) Require or schedule unannounced oil spill drills as required by RCW 90.56.260 to test the sufficiency of oil spill contingency plans approved under RCW 90.56.210.

(4) The department shall evaluate the functions of advisory committees created by the department regarding oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response programs, and shall revise or eliminate those functions which are no longer necessary.


[2005 c 304 4; 2004 c 226 4; 2000 c 69 16; 1991 c 200 107; 1990 c 116 10. Formerly RCW 90.48.378.]

Notes: Findings -- Severability -- 1990 c 116: See notes following RCW 90.56.210.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.070
Coordination with federal law.
In carrying out the purposes of this chapter, including the adoption of rules for contingency plans, the department shall to the greatest extent practicable implement this chapter in a manner consistent with federal law.


[1991 c 200 108.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.080
Hazardous substances incident response training and education program.
The division of fire protection services shall establish and manage the Washington oil and hazardous substances incident response training and education program to provide approved classes in hazardous substance response, taught by trained instructors. To carry out this program, the division of fire protection services shall:

(1) Adopt rules necessary to implement the program;

(2) Establish a training and education program by developing the curriculum to be used in the program in colleges, academies, and other educational institutions;

(3) Provide training to local oil and hazardous materials emergency response personnel; and

(4) Establish and collect admission fees and other fees that may be necessary to the program.


[2000 c 69 17; 1991 c 200 109.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.100
Washington wildlife rescue coalition.
(1) The Washington wildlife rescue coalition is established for the purpose of coordinating the rescue and rehabilitation of wildlife injured or endangered by oil spills or the release of other hazardous substances into the environment.

(2) The Washington wildlife rescue coalition shall be composed of:

(a) A representative of the department of fish and wildlife designated by the director of fish and wildlife. The department of fish and wildlife shall be designated as lead agency in the operations of the coalition. The coalition shall be chaired by the representative from the department of fish and wildlife;

(b) A representative of the department of ecology designated by the director;

(c) A representative of the Washington military department emergency management division, designated by the director of the Washington military department;

(d) A licensed veterinarian, with experience and training in wildlife rehabilitation, appointed by the veterinary board of governors;

(e) A lay person, with training and experience in the rescue and rehabilitation of wildlife appointed by the department; and

(f) A person designated by the legislative authority of the county where oil spills or spills of other hazardous substances may occur. This member of the coalition shall serve on the coalition until wildlife rescue and rehabilitation is completed in that county. The completion of any rescue or rehabilitation project shall be determined by the director of fish and wildlife.

(3) The duties of the Washington wildlife rescue coalition are to:

(a) Develop an emergency mobilization plan to rescue and rehabilitate waterfowl and other wildlife that are injured or endangered by an oil spill or the release of other hazardous substances into the environment;

(b) Develop and maintain a resource directory of persons, governmental agencies, and private organizations that may provide assistance in an emergency rescue effort;

(c) Provide advance training and instruction to volunteers in rescuing and rehabilitating waterfowl and wildlife injured or endangered by oil spills or the release of other hazardous substances into the environment. The training may be provided through grants to community colleges or to groups that conduct programs for training volunteers. The coalition representatives from the agencies described in subsection (2) of this section shall coordinate their training efforts and work to provide training opportunities for young citizens;

(d) Obtain and maintain equipment and supplies used in emergency rescue efforts.

(4)(a) Expenses for the coalition may be provided by the coastal protection fund administered according to RCW 90.48.400.

(b) The coalition is encouraged to seek grants, gifts, or donations from private sources in order to carry out the provisions of this section and RCW 90.56.110. Any private funds donated to the commission shall be deposited into the wildlife rescue account hereby created within the *wildlife fund as authorized under Title 77 RCW.


[2000 c 69 18; 1998 c 245 175; 1994 c 264 94; 1992 c 73 32; 1990 c 116 12. Formerly RCW 90.48.387.]

Notes: *Reviser's note: The "state wildlife fund" was renamed the "state wildlife account" pursuant to 2005 c 224 4 and 2005 c 225 4.

Effective dates -- 1992 c 73: See RCW 82.23B.902.


Findings -- Severability -- 1990 c 116: See notes following RCW 90.56.210.







--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.110
Rehabilitation of wildlife Rules.
The department of fish and wildlife may adopt rules including, but not limited to, the following:

(1) Procedures and methods of handling and caring for waterfowl or other wildlife affected by spills of oil and other hazardous materials;

(2) The certification of persons trained in the removal of pollutants from waterfowl or other wildlife;

(3) Development of procedures with respect to removal of oil and other hazardous substances from waterfowl or other wildlife;

(4) The establishment of training exercises, courses, and other training procedures as necessary;

(5) Such other rules as may be reasonably necessary to carry out the intent of RCW 90.56.100.


[1994 c 264 95; 1990 c 116 13. Formerly RCW 90.48.388.]

Notes: Findings -- Severability -- 1990 c 116: See notes following RCW 90.56.210.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.120
Oil spill advisory council Meetings Travel expenses and compensation.
(1)(a) There is established in the office of the governor the oil spill advisory council.

(b) The primary purpose of the council is to maintain the state's vigilance in, by ensuring an emphasis on, the prevention of oil spills to marine waters, while recognizing the importance of also improving preparedness and response.

(c) The council shall be an advisory body only.

(2)(a) In addition to members appointed under (b) of this subsection, the council is composed of the chair-facilitator and sixteen members representing various interests as follows:

(i) Three representatives of environmental organizations;

(ii) One representative of commercial shellfish interests;

(iii) One representative of commercial fisheries that primarily fishes in Washington waters;

(iv) One representative of marine recreation;

(v) One representative of tourism interests;

(vi) Three representatives of county government from counties bordering Puget Sound, the Columbia river/Pacific Ocean, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca/San Juan Islands;

(vii) One representative of marine labor;

(viii) Two representatives of marine trade interests;

(ix) One representative of major oil facilities;

(x) One representative of public ports; and

(xi) An individual who resides on a shoreline who has an interest, experience, and familiarity in the protection of water quality.

(b) In addition to the members identified in this subsection, the governor shall invite the participation of tribal governments through the appointment of two representatives to the council.

(3) Appointments to the council shall reflect a geographical balance and the diversity of populations within the areas potentially affected by oil spills to state waters.

(4) Members shall be appointed by the governor and shall serve four-year terms, except the initial members appointed to the council. Initial members to the council shall be appointed as follows: Six shall serve two-year terms, six shall serve three-year terms, and seven shall serve four-year terms. Vacancies shall be filled by appointment in the same manner as the original appointment for the remainder of the unexpired term of the position vacated. Members serve at the pleasure of the governor.

(5) The governor shall appoint a chair-facilitator who shall serve as a nonvoting member of the council. The chair shall not be an employee of a state agency, nor shall the chair have a financial interest in matters relating to oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response. The chair shall convene the council at least four times per year. At least one meeting per year shall be held in a Columbia river community, an ocean coastal community, and a Puget Sound community. The chair shall consult with councilmembers in setting agendas and determining meeting times and locations.

(6) All members shall be reimbursed for travel expenses while attending meetings of the council or technical advisory committees as provided in RCW 43.03.050 and 43.03.060. Members of the council identified in subsection (2)(a)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii), and (xi) of this section shall be compensated on a per diem basis as a class two group according to RCW 43.03.230.

(7) The first meeting of the council shall be convened by the governor or the governor's designee. Other meetings may be convened by a vote of at least a majority of the voting members of the council, or by call of the chair. All meetings are subject to the open public meetings act. The council shall maintain minutes of all meetings.

(8) To the extent possible, all decisions of the council shall be by the consensus of the members. If consensus is not possible, nine voting members of the council may call for a vote on a matter. When a vote is called, all decisions shall be determined by a majority vote of the voting members present. Two-thirds of the voting members are required to be present for a quorum for all votes. The subject matter of all votes and the vote tallies shall be recorded in the minutes of the council.

(9) The council may form subcommittees and technical advisory committees.


[2005 c 304 2.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.130
Council Duties Work plan Reports.
(1) The duties of the council include:

(a) Selection and hiring of professional staff and expert consultants to support the work of the council;

(b) Early consultation with government decision makers in relation to the state's oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response programs, analyses, rule making, and related oil spill activities;

(c) Providing independent advice, expertise, research, monitoring, and assessment for review of and necessary improvements to the state's oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response programs, analyses, rule making, and other decisions, including those of the Northwest area committee, as well as the adequacy of funding for these programs;

(d) Monitoring and providing information to the public as well as state and federal agencies regarding state of the art oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response programs;

(e) Actively seeking public comments on and proposals for specific measures to improve the state's oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response program, including measures to improve the effectiveness of the Northwest area committee;

(f) Evaluating incident response reports and making recommendations to the department regarding improvements;

(g) Consulting with the department on lessons learned and agency progress on necessary actions in response to lessons learned;

(h) Promoting opportunities for the public to become involved in oil spill response activities and provide assistance to community groups with an interest in oil spill prevention and response, and coordinating with the department on the development and implementation of a citizens' involvement plan;

(i) Serving as an advisory body to the department on matters relating to international, national, and regional issues concerning oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response, and providing a mechanism for stakeholder and public consideration of federal actions relating to oil spill preparedness, prevention, and response in or near the waters of the state with recommended changes or improvements in federal policies on these matters;

(j) Accepting moneys from appropriations, gifts, grants, or donations for the purposes of this section; and

(k) Any other activities necessary to maintain the state's vigilance in preventing oil spills.

(2) The council shall establish a work plan for accomplishing the duties identified in subsection (1) of this section.

(3) The council is not intended to address issues related to spills involving hazardous substances.

(4) By September 15, 2006, the council shall recommend to the governor and appropriate committees of the legislature, proposals for the long-term funding of the council's activities and for the long-term sustainable funding for oil spill preparedness, prevention, and response activities.

(5) By September 1st of each year, the council shall make recommendations for the continuing improvement of the state's oil spill prevention, preparedness, and response activities through a report to the governor, the director, and the appropriate committees of the senate and house of representatives.


[2005 c 304 3.]




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.200
Prevention plans.
(1) The owner or operator for each onshore and offshore facility shall prepare and submit to the department an oil spill prevention plan in conformance with the requirements of this chapter. The plans shall be submitted to the department in the time and manner directed by the department. The spill prevention plan may be consolidated with a spill contingency plan submitted pursuant to RCW 90.56.210. The department may accept plans prepared to comply with other state or federal law as spill prevention plans to the extent those plans comply with the requirements of this chapter. The department, by rule, shall establish standards for spill prevention plans.

(2) The spill prevention plan for an onshore or offshore facility shall:

(a) Establish compliance with the federal oil pollution act of 1990, if applicable, and financial responsibility requirements under federal and state law;

(b) Certify that supervisory and other key personnel in charge of transfer, storage, and handling of oil have received certification pursuant to RCW 90.56.220;

(c) Certify that the facility has an operations manual required by RCW 90.56.230;

(d) Certify the implementation of alcohol and drug use awareness programs;

(e) Describe the facility's maintenance and inspection program and contain a current maintenance and inspection record of the storage and transfer facilities and related equipment;

(f) Describe the facility's alcohol and drug treatment programs;

(g) Describe spill prevention technology that has been installed, including overflow alarms, automatic overflow cut-off switches, secondary containment facilities, and storm water retention, treatment, and discharge systems;

(h) Describe any discharges of oil to the land or the water of more than twenty-five barrels in the prior five years and the measures taken to prevent a reoccurrence;

(i) Describe the procedures followed by the facility to contain and recover any oil that spills during the transfer of oil to or from the facility;

(j) Provide for the incorporation into the facility during the period covered by the plan of those measures that will provide the best achievable protection for the public health and the environment; and

(k) Include any other information reasonably necessary to carry out the purposes of this chapter required by rules adopted by the department.

(3) The department shall only approve a prevention plan if it provides the best achievable protection from damages caused by the discharge of oil into the waters of the state and if it determines that the plan meets the requirements of this section and rules adopted by the department.

(4) Upon approval of a prevention plan, the department shall provide to the person submitting the plan a statement indicating that the plan has been approved, the facilities covered by the plan, and other information the department determines should be included.

(5) The approval of a prevention plan shall be valid for five years. An owner or operator of a facility shall notify the department in writing immediately of any significant change of which it is aware affecting its prevention plan, including changes in any factor set forth in this section or in rules adopted by the department. The department may require the owner or operator to update a prevention plan as a result of these changes.

(6) The department by rule shall require prevention plans to be reviewed, updated, if necessary, and resubmitted to the department at least once every five years.

(7) Approval of a prevention plan by the department does not constitute an express assurance regarding the adequacy of the plan nor constitute a defense to liability imposed under this chapter or other state law.

(8) This section does not authorize the department to modify the terms of a collective bargaining agreement.


[2000 c 69 19; 1991 c 200 201.]

Notes: Reviser's note: Chapter 226, Laws of 2004 (Substitute Senate Bill No. 6641) directed that: "If specific funding for the purposes of sections 5 and 6 of this act, referencing sections 5 and 6 of this act by bill or chapter or section number, is not provided by June 30, 2004, in the omnibus transportation appropriations act, sections 5 and 6 of this act are null and void." Substitute Senate Bill No. 6641 was referenced by bill number in chapter 276, Laws of 2004, the omnibus operating appropriations act, in section 301(9), however neither the bill nor the chapter number were mentioned in chapter 229, Laws of 2004, the omnibus transportation appropriations act. Therefore, the chapter 226, Laws of 2004 amendments to RCW 90.56.200 and 90.56.210, did not take effect.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

90.56.210
Contingency plans.
(1) Each onshore and offshore facility shall have a contingency plan for the containment and cleanup of oil spills from the facility into the waters of the state and for the protection of fisheries and wildlife, shellfish beds, natural resources, and public and private property from such spills. The department shall by rule adopt and periodically revise standards for the preparation of contingency plans. The department shall require contingency plans, at a minimum, to meet the following standards:

(a) Include full details of the method of response to spills of various sizes from any facility which is covered by the plan;

(b) Be designed to be capable in terms of personnel, materials, and equipment, of promptly and properly, to the maximum extent practicable, as defined by the department removing oil and minimizing any damage to the environment resulting from a worst case spill;

(c) Provide a clear, precise, and detailed description of how the plan relates to and is integrated into relevant contingency plans which have been prepared by cooperatives, ports, regional entities, the state, and the federal government;

(d) Provide procedures for early detection of oil spills and timely notification of such spills to appropriate federal, state, and local authorities under applicable state and federal law;

(e) State the number, training preparedness, and fitness of all dedicated, prepositioned personnel assigned to direct and implement the plan;

(f) Incorporate periodic training and drill programs to evaluate whether personnel and equipment provided under the plan are in a state of operational readiness at all times;

(g) Describe important features of the surrounding environment, including fish and wildlife habitat, shellfish beds, environmentally and archaeologically sensitive areas, and public facilities. The departments of ecology, fish and wildlife, and natural resources, and the *office of archaeology and historic preservation, upon request, shall provide information that they have available to assist in preparing this description. The description of archaeologically sensitive areas shall not be required to be included in a contingency plan until it is reviewed and updated pursuant to subsection (9) of this section;

(h) State the means of protecting and mitigating effects on the environment, including fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and other wildlife, and ensure that implementation of the plan does not pose unacceptable risks to the public or the environment;

(i) Provide arrangements for the prepositioning of oil spill containment and cleanup equipment and trained personnel at strategic locations from which they can be deployed to the spill site to promptly and properly remove the spilled oil;

(j) Provide arrangements for enlisting the use of qualified and trained cleanup personnel to implement the plan;

(k) Provide for disposal of recovered spilled oil in accordance with local, state, and federal laws;

(l) Until a spill prevention plan has been submitted pursuant to RCW 90.56.200, state the measures that have been taken to reduce the likelihood that a spill will occur, including but not limited to, design and operation of a facility, training of personnel, number of personnel, and backup systems designed to prevent a spill;

(m) State the amount and type of equipment available to respond to a spill, where the equipment is located, and the extent to which other contingency plans rely on the same equipment; and

(n) If the department has adopted rules permitting the use of dispersants, the circumstances, if any, and the manner for the application of the dispersants in conformance with the department's rules.

(2)(a) The following shall submit contingency plans to the department within six months after the department adopts rules establishing standards for contingency plans under subsection (1) of this section:

(i) Onshore facilities capable of storing one million gallons or more of oil; and

(ii) Offshore facilities.

(b) Contingency plans for all other onshore and offshore facilities shall be submitted to the department within eighteen months after the department has adopted rules under subsection (1) of this section. The department may adopt a schedule for submission of plans within the eighteen-month period.

(3)(a) The owner or operator of a facility shall submit the contingency plan for the facility.

(b) A person who has contracted with a facility to provide containment and cleanup services and who meets the standards established pursuant to RCW 90.56.240, may submit the plan for any facility for which the person is contractually obligated to provide services. Subject to conditions imposed by the department, the person may submit a single plan for more than one facility.

(4) A contingency plan prepared for an agency of the federal government or another state that satisfies the requirements of this section and rules adopted by the department may be accepted by the department as a contingency plan under this section. The department shall ensure that to the greatest extent possible, requirements for contingency plans under this section are consistent with the requirements for contingency plans under federal law.

(5) In reviewing the contingency plans required by this section, the department shall consider at least the following factors:

(a) The adequacy of containment and cleanup equipment, personnel, communications equipment, notification procedures and call down lists, response time, and logistical arrangements for coordination and implementation of response efforts to remove oil spills promptly and properly and to protect the environment;

(b) The nature and amount of vessel traffic within the area covered by the plan;

(c) The volume and type of oil being transported within the area covered by the plan;

(d) The existence of navigational hazards within the area covered by the plan;

(e) The history and circumstances surrounding prior spills of oil within the area covered by the plan;

(f) The sensitivity of fisheries, shellfish beds, and wildlife and other natural resources within the area covered by the plan;

(g) Relevant information on previous spills contained in on-scene coordinator reports prepared by the department; and

(h) The extent to which reasonable, cost-effective measures to prevent a likelihood that a spill will occur have been incorporated into the plan.

(6) The department shall approve a contingency plan only if it determines that the plan meets the requirements of this section and that, if implemented, the plan is capable, in terms of personnel, materials, and equipment, of removing oil promptly and properly and minimizing any damage to the environment.

(7) The approval of the contingency plan shall be valid for five years. Upon approval of a contingency plan, the department shall provide to the person submitting the plan a statement indicating that the plan has been approved, the facilities or vessels covered by the plan, and other information the department determines should be included.

(8) An owner or operator of a facility shall notify the department in writing immediately of any significant change of which it is aware affecting its contingency plan, including changes in any factor set forth in this section or in rules adopted by the department. The department may require the owner or operator to update a contingency plan as a result of these changes.

(9) The department by rule shall require contingency plans to be reviewed, updated, if necessary, and resubmitted to the department at least once every five years.

(10) Approval of a contingency plan by the department does not constitute an express assurance regarding the adequacy of the plan nor constitute a defense to liability imposed under this chapter or other state law.


[2005 c 78 1; 2000 c 69 20; 1992 c 73 33; 1991 c 200 202; 1990 c 116 3. Formerly RCW 90.48.371.]

Notes: Reviser's note: *(1) Powers, duties, and functions of the office of archaeology and historic preservation were transferred to the department of archaeology and historic preservation pursuant to 2005 c 333 12.

(2) Chapter 226, Laws of 2004 (Substitute Senate Bill No. 6641) directed that: "If specific funding for the purposes of sections 5 and 6 of this act, referencing sections 5 and 6 of this act by bill or chapter or section number, is not provided by June 30, 2004, in the omnibus transportation appropriations act, sections 5 and 6 of this act are null and void." Substitute Senate Bill No. 6641 was referenced by bill number in chapter 276, Laws of 2004, the omnibus operating appropriations act, in section 301(9), however neither the bill nor the chapter number were mentioned in chapter 229, Laws of 2004, the omnibus transportation appropriations act. Therefore, the chapter 226, Laws of 2004 amendments to RCW 90.56.200 and 90.56.210, did not take effect. (continued)